Cocoa-Banana Breakfast Cake (or Muffins)

Breakfast.  It can be so boring ~ so unhealthy ~ and so expensive.  Are you stuck in a rut?  Are you tired of paying an arm and a leg for boxed cereal that has little staying power and often little true nutrition?  I am going to start a series on make-ahead breakfast recipes to take the ho-hum out of mornings.  You’ll find yourself looking forward to breakfast!  You might even want to take a look at some of your current recipes and rethink the possibility of using them for a morning meal.  Of course, I always add some fresh fruit to the meal to round it out nutritionally.

Cocoa-Banana Breakfast Cake (or Muffins) 001Whether you have to eat gluten-free, or not, this breakfast cake will please you!  It was so exciting to put the first forkful into my mouth and taste how delicious it was.  The texture is moist and heavy like some decadent muffin that you might buy.  Mmmm.  In fact, Continue reading

Oatmeal Cookie Journey (gluten-free)

Cookies…cookies…cookiesCOOKIES!!!

You guessed it….I love cookies!  (Of course, Cookie Monster was my favorite Muppet.)  Sadly, I haven’t been doing much baking lately, though.  Kinda lost my mojo without wheat flour to make it brainless easy.

Last night and this morning I had such a craving for oatmeal-raisin cookies that I couldn’t Oatmeal Cookie (gluten-free; first attempt) 002help but make another attempt at turning out a good whole-grain gluten-free cookie.  Since I want you to be brave, too, at trying to create new recipes in your kitchen, I am going to take you on this oatmeal cookie journey.  I will tell you what I was thinking as I turned this recipe that I made for years and years with whole wheat flour into this gluten-free version.

First of all, oatmeal cookies are marvelous for attempting to remove the wheat flour, because there isn’t much of it in the recipe at the beginning!  As long as you are using gluten-free oats you are almost home free (or if you are just avoiding wheat and don’t get deathly ill if you get a hold of some teeny amounts gluten, use regular oats.)

To replace the 1 1/2 c. of wheat flour, I decided how hard could it be to use oat flour?  I scooped up 3 c. of oats (because I always double this recipe or they are gone much too soon) and whizzed it up in a dry blender.  (It’s okay if the oats look more like meal than a smooth flour when you are done.)  When I measured the flour after whizzing it, I was 1/4 c. short.  Well, rats!  Rather than try to whiz up that small amount of oats (they get kind of lost in the bottom of the blender and it doesn’t work particularly well), I decided to just throw in some almond meal for the final 1/4 c. that was missing.  Almond meal gives the look and feel of whole wheat flour.  At the last minute, I pondered my coconut flour.  It can help with the baked texture of things to also mimic whole wheat flour.  So, I tossed in a 1/4 c. of that, too!  I figured at worst I would have to add some extra liquid since it seriously soaks up moisture like a sponge left out to dry in the summer sun.

Turns out it was a good choice at the last minute to toss in that coconut flour.  Oat flour can be a little sticky in comparison to whole wheat flour.  The little bit of coconut flour just mopped up any sticky ideas the oat flour might have had and sat back to enjoy the ride.

I chose to add jumbo organic raisins in these cookies – and I made them fairly big since I was in a hurry.  (It only took me an hour to make a double batch from start to finish – not bad.)  Chocolate chips are a nice switch from raisins if you’d rather.  Butterscotch chips are fun, too, if you can find vegan ones.  Coconut flakes are great with any of the above options or by itself (I found some sweetened coconut shreds without any nasty chemicals at Trader Joe’s and I am thrilled.)

I originally thought I was going to have to tweak this recipe again later, but after the whole batch is finished, I don’t think I will need to do so.  They are a little fragile when you first take them off of the cookie sheet, but they firm up nicely as they cool.  If you like, you can leave them on the cookie sheet until they are not so fragile before removing them to a cooling rack.

Oatmeal CookiesOatmeal Cookie (gluten-free; first attempt) 001

  • 1/2 c. Earth Balance buttery sticks (1 stick)
  • 1/4 c. melted coconut oil (virgin is best)
  • 1 1/4 c. evaporated cane juice crystals
  • 2 T. molasses
  • 1 1/2 tsp. vanilla
  • 2 tsp. Ener-G egg replacer powder
  • 1/4 c. + 2 T. non-dairy milk
  • 1 1/4 c. + 2 T. oat flour (1 1/2 c. oats whizzed into meal/flour)
  • 2 T. almond meal/flour
  • 2 T. coconut flour
  • 3 c. oats (I used half and half ~ rolled oats and quick oats)

Preheat oven to 375°.  Cover your cookie sheets with parchment paper (this is vital to make vegan and gluten-free cookies work the best.)

Mix the first 5 ingredients together until smooth.  Stir in the egg replacer powder.  Add the non-dairy milk a little at a time, whipping it into the batter.  By the time it is all in, you should have a lovely fluffy batter.  (Add any extras here, like raisins, chips, coconut, etc.) Mix the dry ingredients in a separate bowl before pouring it all into the wet ingredients.  Mix thoroughly.

Using a teaspoon or a tablespoon, scoop dough against the side of the bowl to press it.  This will give you a sturdier cookie.  You could also press the dough in your hands if you prefer.  Drop spoonfuls onto the cookie sheet.  Bake for 8-10 minutes.  Remove to cooling rack.

Variations:  Add 1 c. raisins, nuts, chocolate chips, and/or coconut

 

Cornbread (muffins or pan)

This recipe has been in my possession for so many years that I didn’t own a printer and it’s handwritten ~ probably didn’t even own a computer and if I did, I doubt it had a word processing program on it!  Yikes.  Some of you may wonder if the world existed then.  The notebook page it’s written on has bent edges, stains, and it needs its 3 holes repaired, causing it to fall out of the notebook regularly.  Originally, it was cut out of a woman’s magazine (who knows which one at this point?) complete with picture.  It was full fat, full milk and eggs, regular degerminated cornmeal, white flour – you name it.  It was pretty bad for you.  The recipe strongly called for cast-iron corn tins – but I didn’t own those, so I substituted the variation provided ~ muffin tins.

Because I wasn’t vegan at that time, I only changed one thing about the recipe – I used whole wheat flour in place of the white.  They were very tasty and everyone was happy when I served them.

Not long afterwards, I had to set the recipe aside.  My children and I were found to have allergies and we all became vegan overnight.  *gulp*  Since I didn’t have such a thing as internet yet to look for new recipes, I needed to learn how to take my much-loved ones and transform them.  (And while I was at it, one son had wheat and corn allergies, so I had to make something work for him, too.  I substituted millet flour for the cornmeal and barley or spelt flour for the wheat and made a small pan for him.  It had a stickier texture – you have to cut back on the liquid a bit – but it was worth it to him to eat something similar to our version.)  After a few attempts and substitutions, the recipe was deemed successful.  Update: I’ve learned that substituting oat flour for the wheat works very well.  It’s a little more fragile than the wheat version, but not terribly so.

This still is a favorite of mine.  I love it with chili, “chicken”-noodle soup, baked beans, and for breakfast with strawberry or raspberry jam and non-dairy milk over it  (Hey, don’t knock it until you try it!  Esp. if you use coconut milk.  Mmmmm….) – or warm for “dessert” with vegan “butter” and maple syrup drizzled over it.

Cornbread

  • 1 c. whole wheat flour or oat flour (whiz rolled oats in blender until floury)
  • 1 c. stone-ground cornmeal
  • 2 tsp. baking powder
  • 3/4 tsp. salt
  • 1 ½ tsp. Ener-G egg replacer
  • 1/4 c. honey (or maple syrup)
  • 1 1/3 c. soy milk
  • 2 T. melted coconut oil (for best texture) or unsweetened applesauce or half and half of each

Preheat oven to 425 degrees.  Spray muffin tin or 8”x8” pan with oil.

Combine dry ingredients.  Whisk liquid ingredients in separate bowl; add to dry ingredients and whisk until batter is smooth and just begins to thicken – about 30 seconds.  Spoon into pan.  Bake muffins for 14 minutes or 8”x8” pan for 18-20 minutes, until edges are beginning to slightly brown and center is firm.  (If the edges begin to look too brown, the bottom will already be too dark.)

Variation:  Double and place in a 9”x13” cake pan and bake for 22-25 minutes.