Savory Baked Beans (with sweet option in notes)

I adore baked beans – sweet ones – so I had to figure out a way to make them taste good without the added inflammatory and caloric additions of sweetener.  These came out spectacularly savory and delicious.  Organic products aid in gaining the extraSavory Baked Beans flavor that the sweet usually masks.  If you still want a touch of sweetness, check out the note at the bottom.

I used a 2-qt casserole and ended up with splatter in the oven.  You might want to use a large dish to avoid that.

Without further ado – here’s the recipe!

SAVORY BAKED BEANS

  • 4 cans mostly drained organic pinto beans
  • 1 15-oz can organic tomato sauce
  • 1/2 tsp hickory smoke seasoning
  • 3/8 tsp organic dry mustard
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 tsp organic garlic powder
  • 2 tsp organic onion powder
  • 2 T. nutritional yeast flakes
  • 2 c. chopped organic onion
  • 3 lg organic garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/4 c water, as needed (see picture at bottom for how soupy it should look before baking)

Mix all in a large covered (this can be foil) casserole dish, adding water if things look fairly dry.  Bake at 375 degrees for 75-90 minutes, or until onions are soft enough for your tastes. To speed the baking process up some, you could saute the onions in the 1/4 c of water first.  

Note: if you want sweet baked beans, add 1-4 T. maple syrup, or, perhaps, 1 T. molasses and 1-3 T. maple syrup.Savory Baked Beans uncooked

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Cilantro-Lime Brown Rice

After listening to Dr. Hans Diehl (creator of the CHIP program) speak this weekend, I am once again tweaking our vegan diet.  We already have been consuming vasts quantities of fruits and veggies, including for juicing.  Now we’re ncreasing whole grains (I’m not talking about the flour, but the actual grains) while keeping out the sneaky processed flours that show up when your guard is down and you buy packaged things; cutting back – to the point of eliminating – processed sweeteners (this is my biggest difficulty); and decreasing oils (it’s recommended to not use any added oils, but I’m not sure about that one for me with my mega-dry skin and hair.)  Not only is this a way to maximize health long-term, but in the short term (less than 1 week), I’ve lost pounds!  And I’m eating way more than I was.  Win, win!

BUT!  If my family is going to tolerate me messing with their food – again – it had better be tasty stuff that I fix them, or there will be a revolt against lots of grain, especially plain old rice, showing up on their plates.  While I love the stuff, most of them have never been fans.  Surprisingly, I have a lot of recipes for main dishes using whole grains that we’ve tried.  It’s time to dust off some of the tried-and-true recipes, as well as invent some new ones.

Cilantro-Lime RiceLast night, my son-in-law showed up with a brown bag from Chipotle.  It smelled so good!  Short of putting on my coat and driving to Chipotle, I decided right then that the next day I would make up a really big batch of cilantro-lime rice to split up into smaller amounts for the freezer so that on short notice, I could make something wonderful when tantalizing food teases me.

I’ve tried to make this before, but it fell short.  This time, I thought some onion, garlic, and lime zest would help things along.  And how!!  What a difference.  I had a healthy scoop with some black beans and tomatoes for lunch – yum.

Freeze the extra amounts in meal-sized packages for later use unless you have a large family.

Cilantro-Lime Brown Rice 

  • 3 c. long brown rice (basmati or jasmine is nice, but not imperative)
  • 8 1/2-9 c. water (or whatever your container of rice indicates is needed)
  • 1 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1 small onion, diced
  • 2-3 garlic cloves, minced
  • zest of 1 lime, microplaned (this really makes it shine)
  • juice from 1 lime
  • 1 c. loosely packed cilantro leaves, minced

Bring the first 6 ingredients to a boil in a heavy-duty 3-qt. pan, and then cook over medium-low heat until the water is absorbed (or a little tiny bit is left in the bottom of the pan.)  Taste test it to make sure the rice is soft.  If needed, add a little water and continue cooking.  When it is finished, stir it well and replace the lid, leaving it to rest for at least 15 minutes to steam and get fluffier.  Meanwhile, juice the lime and toss it with the cilantro leaves.

Once the rice is finished steaming, toss it with the lime juice and cilantro.  Serve with any Mexican-style meal, or just with some beans for a quick meal.

Anti-Cruciferous Stir Fry

Today was unusually helter-skelter for the whole family.  Everybody is helping to roof a house (except me ~ I’m holding down the fort doing all the cooking, cleaning, etc.)  Due to the heat, they quit early today, so K and I went to get some much-needed groceries once she showered.  It took us so long that once we got home she had only 20 minutes before she and R had to leave for Vacation Bible School, where they are key staff members!  No time for her to even eat, let alone fix something first.  Hubby came home for 5 minutes before he had to go back out for an appointment.  That left N (my son-in-law) and I at home, because J is out of town.

Now, N has unfortunate allergies to all cruciferous veggies, as well as sesame and sunflower seeds.  It makes K pretty nuts avoiding all those things at the grocery store!  And eating out?  Forget it.  Do you know how much sesame oil and sunflower oil are in things?  Bah.

I knew I needed to make something nourishing for everybody to eat once they landed back at home ~ but no idea what that should be!  I threw on a pot of rice, because at least that could be simmering while I came up with something amazing.  I’ve been hungry for a rice bowl of some sort (whether Chipotle-style or stir-fry-style, I wasn’t fussy.)  I remembered some chik-style strips I bought on clearance, so began to build an idea from there.  Originally, I was thinking lemony-“chicken”-asparagus, but it kinda morphed from there.  It didn’t seem like it would make enough.  So, while I stood at the freezer door digging for the asparagus, I saw some other bags of frozen stir-fry-esque veggies.  I started tossing this and that in until I had a pan full of yummy nutritious veggies!  Overall, it took more time and effort to decide what to fix than it took to throw it all together.  🙂

In retrospect, one of the new kinds of “veggies” I found on sale at the health food store I would not buy again.  Frozen bags of mushrooms just don’t have a marvelous texture.  I believe I would either skip them, use fresh ones (if I had them on hand), or even open a can of random mushrooms (usually I have portabellas in the cupboard.)

Anti-Cruciferous Stir Fry 003

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anti-Cruciferous Stir-Fry

  • 1-2 T. organic virgin coconut oil
  • 1 onion, halved and thinly sliced
  • 1 carrot, julienned
  • 5-8 oz. frozen tri-colored peppers
  • 1 10-oz pkg. Woodstock frozen mixed mushrooms (I recommend fresh or canned, actually)
  • 1 10-oz pkg. Woodstock frozen snap peas
  • 1 12-oz pkg. frozen asparagus spears, cut into 2″ chunks
  • 2 c. of your favorite “chicken” substitute
  • 1 heaping T. cornstarch (or arrowroot)
  • 1 T. chicken-style seasoning
  • Bragg’s Liquid Amino Acids (or soy sauce)
  • 1/2 c. water
  • juice from 1 very small lemon
  • hot cooked brown rice

Melt the coconut oil in a large frying pan.  Toss in the onion and carrot pieces and begin sauteing them.  Open up all of the frozen veggie bags and stir them into the frying pan, along with the “chicken” substitute.  Squirt Bragg’s back and forth across the veggies and stir again.  Turn the heat up to medium-high to get everything really cooking, as frozen veggies take so long to stir-fry.  You should see a fair amount of liquid form in the bottom of the pan ~ this is as it should be.  Stir the veggies often.  When they are to the tenderness you prefer, mix the cornstarch, chicken-style seasoning, and water together, stirring the mixture into the veggies until everything looks a little shiny from the thickened sauce.  Remove from heat and sprinkle the lemon juice over it all.  Stir.  Serve over rice with extra Bragg’s on the table.

Garbanzo Melt Open-faced Sandwiches

Garbanzo Melts 2For some reason I had not made garbanzo melts in a long time.  When J and R asked what was for supper and heard this was it, they made the kind of loud, growly “OOOOHH’s” only teen boys tend to make.  I had no idea of the popularity of these, or I would have been making them more often!

The great thing about these is that any leftover filling works for a cold sandwich, too.  You can use your favorite bread, including an artisan variety, which will make these even more amazing!  Gluten-free bread will suffice here, too, as long as you have a tasty one.  The best thing is that these are simple to make, you probably have all of the ingredients in your cupboard already, and they can be quickly thrown together.  Win!

Another option for these is to make them into regular grilled sandwiches on a griddle, rather than open-faced.  They just tend to squish out when you bite them!

As usual, organic ingredients will give you the best flavor and nutrition.

This recipe uses 10-12 slices of bread, but you can easily cut it in half if you want to make less.  Remember ~ any extra filling keeps well in the refrigerator.

Garbanzo Melt Open-faced Sandwiches

  • 1/2 of an onion (red is best, but any will do)
  • 2 cans garbanzo beans, rinsed and drained
  • 4 T. +/- Veganaise non-dairy mayo
  • 1 1/2 – 2 tsp. mustard (yellow will work, but spicy brown is great)
  • 1/4 tsp. garlic powder
  • 1/2 tsp. onion powder
  • salt to taste
  • 3-4 T. relish
  • 10-12 slices of bread
  • extra virgin olive oil in mist-er, or non-dairy butter
  • 15-18 slices of Tofutti vegan cheese or more (how many slices will depend on how big your bread is)

Preheat oven to 400°.

Mince the onion in a food processor.  Add the beans, mayo, mustard, garlic powder, and onion powder.  Pulse the food processor until the ingredients are well mixed and the beans are roughly ground.  The texture can be fairly rough to as smooth as hummus depending on your preference.  I like somewhere in between.

Remove mixture to a bowl.  Add 3 T. of relish.  Taste and add more relish and salt to taste.  Your brand of garbanzo bean will make the difference of how much salt needs to be added.

Spray one side of each slice of bread (or lightly “butter” it), placing it oil-side down on a cookie sheet.  Spread garbanzo bean mixture onto each slice.  Lay slices of cheese on top of the open-faced sandwiches, breaking slices in half or thirds if necessary to add enough to completely cover each piece of bread.

Bake for 15 minutes, or until the cheese is soft and melty looking.  The bottom of the bread will be toasted and crispy.

Italian Quinoa

There has been a long dry spell for my creativity in the kitchen.  I’m sure it’s been caused in part by my busy life and in part by my mental focus on creating a dessert for the up-coming Virtual Vegan Potluck (more on that soon.)  Overall, the family has been receiving old stand-bys on the table and some lazy versions of home cooked meals!

No wonder, then, my family just about licked the pan clean last night when I served this.  I was a bit surprised, because most of them aren’t big fans of sun-dried tomatoes and usually pick them out to toss onto my plate (which means I get tons more – yay!)  However, last night I didn’t get any extras on my plate!  None!  If I had known that, I would have put more in the recipe than I did.  I was informed it is a texture issue and these sun-dried tomatoes were soft enough for their palates this time.  Who knew?  Therefore, I wrote a scope of choice below for how many tomatoes you use.  The picture shows the quinoa with about 4 oz. of sun-dried tomatoes (approximately).  It would have been tastier with the larger amount and that is what I will do next time.

Italian QuinoaYou can switch a few things around in this recipe depending on what you have in your cupboards and refrigerator.  I didn’t have any fresh mushrooms, so I used canned, but either works.  If you prefer a stronger tasting olive such as Kalamata, then by all means, try those.  I’m the only one in this house who likes cooked bell peppers – of any color, so I didn’t toss any in, but those would be great here, too – either fresh or frozen.  (I figured I was pushing it by using the sun-dried tomatoes, let alone making it “worse” in their minds by adding peppers.)

Addendum:  You will need a large frying pan with lid or dutch oven.  Mine is 4-5 quarts!

Italian Quinoa

  • 1 lg. onion, chopped
  • 2 Tofurkey Italian “sausage” links, diced (optional, or reduce)
  • 6-8 oz. frozen artichoke hearts (half a bag)
  • olive oil (may use oil from sun-dried tomatoes)
  • 4-8 oz. sun-dried tomatoes packed in oil
  • 4 oz. can of chopped portabella mushrooms
  • 1 can black olives, sliced or quartered
  • 2 tsp. Italian seasoning
  • 4 c. water
  • 2 T. chicken-style seasoning
  • 2 c. quinoa, rinsed and drained
  • soy parmesan “cheese”

Saute the onion, Tofurkey links, and artichoke hearts in just enough olive oil to keep them from sticking or burning.  As the artichokes thaw, they will put off some liquid that will help.  Once the onion is softening some and the artichokes can be mushed with the back of a spoon to break them up and distribute them a bit, add remaining ingredients, excluding parmesan “cheese.”  (Include some or all of the oil from the tomatoes for the best overall flavor.)  Bring to a boil and simmer for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally.  Sprinkle soy parmesan over the whole dish and stir in.  Serve with extra parmesan at the table.

Best served with cooked greens or a salad.

Cauliflower Butternut Squash Soup

Standing in front of the cupboards in my kitchen and peering into the depths of the refrigerator, I wonder what to make for supper.  (Never mind that I have a weekly menu I usually follow ~ it has already gotten so messed up that it is unrecognizable by this point.)  Although it would seem unlikely that I should make soup this close to the end of March, the fact that we are expecting a significant snow storm tonight belies that thought.  But what kind of soup?

Taking another mental glance at the refrigerator’s contents, I realize that I have a head of cauliflower that needs to be used before it gets all spotted.  Since I have no desire to waste a perfectly good organic cauliflower I get it out and plunk it onto the counter.  What else to go with it…?

Every great once in a while some wild combination pops into my head.  Keep in mind that I am not typically a wild-idea person culinarily speaking, and certainly my family is not adventurous when it comes to eating. I notice a languishing butternut squash on a corner counter.  Ping!  A weird idea comes into my head.  Wondering if anybody else has ever thought of such a soup, I contact my good friend Google to see.  (What did we do before such luxuries?)  Sure enough, many entries are listed.  Back to the kitchen I go to start the creation process comforted by the fact that this shouldn’t come out totally warped.

Here I simply must give a warning note.  If you have never peeled and cut up an uncooked butternut squash, I have to say that it is not for the faint of heart nor the dull of knife!  Yikes.  I had never tried this before, but I have seen plenty of recipes that tell you to do it, so I assume that people have had success peeling squash.  First off I broke one of my vegetable peelers (thankfully, not my favorite one.)  I messed around and fiddled with different processes until I settled on the best way for me.  I got out my large serrated knife and cut

off a relatively thin slice of the blossom end.  Standing it on this now-flat end, I started at the squash’s “waist” and dug the knife in and cut/sawed down toward the bottom, curving slightly around the “hips.”  This actually worked pretty well, but again, it is not an easy process.  You’ll need to hitch up your britches for this one!  My forearm and hand are going to complain tomorrow.  I lay the squash on it’s side to do the top half of it with sideways slices.  Good luck.  (I suppose you could buy it already cut up….)

I have a terrible tendency to make enormous soups.  I have cut this one down for you since I would guess most of you don’t want to make 1 1/2-2 gallons of soup at a time!  But if you want to use an entire head of cauliflower and all of a medium butternut squash like I did, triple the recipe.  🙂

Cauliflower Butternut Squash Soup

Cauliflower Butternut Squash Soup

  • 2 c. chopped cauliflower (small pieces, randomly hacked up)
  • 2 c. diced butternut squash (1/2-1″ pieces)
  • 2/3 c. chopped onion
  • 1/2 c. sliced celery
  • 1-2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 4 c. water
  • 2 1/2 T. chicken-style seasoning
  • 1/3 of a bag of chopped frozen spinach
  • 2 tsp. Trader Joe’s South African Smoke Seasoning Blend **
  • 1/4-1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 tsp. dillweed
  • 1/4 tsp. basil
  • 1/3 c. quinoa, well rinsed and drained

Toss everything except the quinoa into a large pot and bring to a boil.  Gently boil for 10-15 minutes or until the cauliflower and squash are tender.  (The onions might not be yet.)  Stir in the rinsed quinoa and simmer for another 10-15 minutes, or until the quinoa’s little curls release and it becomes soft.

**Trader Joe’s South African Smoke Seasoning Blend contains smoked paprika flakes, sea salt, garlic, and basil.  The label states that it “adds that wonderful Umami flavor, which can be elusive and difficult to achieve.”  I’ve never had any Umami flavored anything before, but I think you could probably modified this soup with some hickory smoke drops and some Spike seasoning blend if you don’t have access to a Trader Joe’s.

Olive and Veggie Burger Hash

I love to play with my food!  That’s probably why I write a vegan food blog (although, you wouldn’t know it lately, because I’ve been AWOL – tsk, tsk.)  Tonight, hubby was going to be late and the teen boys were going to eat after their meeting.  I had time to play!

Lately I’ve been very hungry for savory things ~ quite out of character for a woman with a sweet tooth the size of Montana!  I wanted something really interesting.  This recipe isn’t what it started out to be…and it’s better than I hoped, because I just kept adding things to make it more interesting.  Once I pulled out J’s large jar of green olives to add to it things really came together.  Usually, I’m not a green-olive fan ~ just on pizza occasionally, in potato salad, and, apparently, in this.  😀

I would have loved to have added mushrooms to this, but, alas, they didn’t make it into the grocery cart this week.

There is no picture, unfortunately.  Not only were we too hungry to wait for a photo to be taken, but in all honesty, this just isn’t a photographic dish!  It isn’t very pretty.  But, man, does it taste good!

Olive and Veggie Burger Hash

  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 2-3 T. extra virgin olive oil
  • 8-10 oz. frozen artichoke hearts
  • 3 veggie burgers of choice (Boca Burger “hamburger” type or gluten-free version) or an equal amount of burger-type crumbles
  • 2 cloves of garlic, minced (if you love garlic, please, please use more!  I have a hubby who only tolerates it)
  • 1/2 can black olives, halved (if you like Greek olives, or such, use those)
  • equal amount of green olives, sliced
  • salt to taste

Place onion, artichoke hearts, and oil in a large frying pan and begin heating on high.  When you hear sizzling, turn the heat down to medium high and push the vegetables aside to clear a spot for the burgers on the bottom of the pan.  When the burgers have thawed some, use a spatula or a flat-edged bamboo utensil to break them into small pieces.  Add salt at this time to your taste.  (I like just a sprinkling.)

Once these things are softening well, add the garlic and toss well.  Stir often to keep the garlic from burning to the bottom of the pan.  Add the olives and heat through.
Serve.

This is super good with sliced tomatoes fresh from the garden.  We also had asparagus spears and sweet potato fries.

Substitution Soup (aka: Eggplant-Cabbage Soup)

This is a bit earlier in the year than I usually make soup ~ but with cooler evenings arriving earlier than normal, I couldn’t resist.  Last week I found a very large organic eggplant at Kroger.  I’d never seen one there before, so I quickly pounced on it!  Since I needed to use it before it went the way of other science experiments in the back of my frig, this influenced my decision to make this particular soup.

My dear high school friend who taught me about this soup has a different name for it than I use.  She calls it garbage pail soup, because you can throw in just about anything you want and it’s likely to taste good.  Use up the veggies that just can’t wait much longer.  Throw in whatever meat-like substitutes you like.  Just start with the base of the soup and have fun.

I do wish the greens would stay brighter for visuals with this soup, but my family doesn’t like the texture of them wilted at the last minute of cooking time, so I have to put up with duller-looking greens.  The good thing?  It still tastes amazing!  (I ate 2 large bowls of it.)

There is one thing you should know.  This makes a HUGE pot of soup that will last you for more than one meal.  You can freeze some of it.  You can add something new each night to it to make it slightly different.  Or you can invite a crowd over for supper.  🙂

Substitution Soup

Absolutely necessary:

  • 12-16+ c. filtered or well water (depending on the size of your cabbage and other veggie amounts)  Good water is important to the taste of your soup
  • 1 small-to-medium cabbage, diced or sliced
  • 1 eggplant, peeled and diced
  • 2 large onions (more if you like)
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 28-oz. can crushed tomatoes
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 T. basil (more if using fresh)
  • 1 1/2 – 3 tsp. Marmite or Vegex (add the smaller amount and taste test later)
  • 6-8 T. chicken-style seasoning     (ditto)
  • salt to taste
  • 1 T. +/- sweetener (depending on how acidic your canned tomatoes are), optional

Variables:

  • herbs and seasonings of choice (including Spike*, or Mrs. Dash)
  • 3-6 c. diced or shredded potatoes* (or use small cauliflower florets or corn)
  • 1-2 lbs. green vegetables ~ may be frozen (chopped leafy greens such as spinach*, kale, turnip greens*, etc., zucchini – diced or shredded, green beans, chopped broccoli, etc.
  • 1/2-1 c. dried lentils* (or add canned beans at the end of cooking time)
  • 1/2-1 1/2 c. brown rice*, millet, barley (increase cooking time), or other whole grain
  • veggie meat of your choice ~ use more than one kind for added interest ~ chorizo* (for a spicy version), TVP, seitan, homemade or canned gluten pieces, broken soy curls*, soy hot dogs or links, Gimme Lean, chopped up soy burgers, Tofurkey “sausages,” etc.

Throw everything from the “absolutely necessary” list into a large stock pot.  Bring this to a boil while you chop everything else, adding as you go.  The cabbage will decrease in size as it cooks, so you may not need as much water as you think you might.  You may always add more later, as well as more seasonings to balance the extra water.  When the lentils, rice, and potatoes are cooked, taste the soup and see if it needs something, like more salt, or some other kind of seasoning.  Adjust it as needed.  Let the soup cool to serving temperature as a large stockpot of soup can be seriously hot.  Pair it with some marvelous bread and enjoy!

*my choices for the soup pictured

Hummus

Everybody has a favorite hummus recipe, right?  Well…sometimes the answer is ‘no.’  This post is for those poor deprived souls who don’t already have their own go-to recipe for hummus.

This is super easy and so much cheaper than buying a tub of it in the store ~ some of them are quite pricey.  (And have you checked out the ingredients lists on some of those?  Ick.  I don’t like canola oil or vinegar.  I want healthier choices.)

Hummus

  • 1 can garbanzo beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 1/2-2 T. lemon juice
  • 2 T. tahini (Joyva is my favorite brand – for taste and ease of stirring)
  • 1-2 tsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 clove fresh garlic (2-3 for garlic hummus)
  • 1/4-1/3 c. chopped onion
  • heaping 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1/4-1/3 c. water (depending on how watery your onion is, and desired thickness)

Blend either in food processor or blender until very smooth.

Variations:  add in one or more of the following ~ roasted garlic, sun-dried tomatoes, basil, green onion, dillweed, spinach, etc.  Look at the flavors in the store and experiment with add-ins.  If you are adding in a slightly liquidy item, decrease your water.

Sun-Dried Tomato Tofu Spread

My husband isn’t a fan of sandwiches.  Actually, there are a number of food things of which he isn’t a fan.  It can make preparing food difficult if I cater to his tastes.  Thankfully, he’s not demanding about it and will quietly eat whatever is set in front of him (unlike my fussy eater…who should know better at almost 15.)  This was his favorite spread of the 3 that I made last week.

That being said, his favorite way of eating it wasn’t on a sandwich!  (No surprise there!)  He put it on top of leftover rice and heated it in the microwave.  Then after tasting it he said something about ketchup….*gasp!*  (I’m telling you, having a non-taster destroy finely-tuned “gourmet” dishes can do something to your psyche!  lol) I couldn’t bear it.  I said, “Here, give it to me.”  And disappeared into the kitchen.  There was half a jar of pizza sauce and some vegan mozzarella cheese leftover in the frig.  I topped the whole thing artfully with those items and reheated it all in the microwave.  Now you know why it was his favorite of the fillings ~ because it was more like a pizza casserole!  (Actually, it smelled wonderful heated up even before I embellished it.  It probably would make into patties or meatballs, or into a casserole situation very nicely.)

Nevertheless, this does make a marvelous sandwich spread.  I can say this not only because I like it so much, but because my fussy eater loved it ~ even though it does have sun-dried tomatoes in it!

If you use organic ingredients (as in any recipe), the results will be tastier.

Tofu Spread

  • 1/2 c. pecan meal (or very finely chopped pecans – you can do this in the food processor before you chop any of the other moist ingredients)
  • 1/4 of a large onion
  • 1 7-8″ stalk of celery heart, cut into several chunks
  • 14-16 oz. water-packed extra-firm tofu, rinsed and squeezed out some
  • 1/4 c. sliced or diced sun-dried tomatoes ~ oil packed
  • 1 T. extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tsp. basil
  • 1/2 tsp. garlic powder
  • 1/4 c. Bragg’s Liquid Aminos
  • 1 T. nutritional yeast

Place pecan meal in a bowl.  Finely chop onion and celery in food processor.  Place in the bowl with the pecan meal.

Process remaining ingredients until sun-dried tomatoes are mostly in small pieces and tofu is not smooth, but evenly textured and well mixed with everything else.  (See picture.)  Scrape out into the bowl with pecan meal, onion, and celery.  Stir everything is evenly combined.  Chill for an hour or so to meld flavors.